Thursday, January 7, 3019

QUICK LINKS TO OUR BLOG POSTS

MOST   POPULAR

ABANDONED TRAILS - THE BOOK   -   FREE DOWNLOAD

THE  GREAT CAVE 
THE HANGING STEPS
TILTING   ROCK
GREEN MOUNTAIN RAILROAD TRAIL
GREEN  MT.  RAILWAY  LOWER  SECTION
COMPASS HARBOR AND OLD FARM
ANEMONE CAVE - THE DEVIL'S OVEN
THE  STONE  ARCHES  OF  EAGLE  LAKE
CADILLAC  MOUNTAIN'S   HIDDEN  WATERFALL
DORR  MOUNTAIN  CREVICE  CAVE
SECRET  PARK  RANGER  TRAIL
THE  BEAR'S  DEN
GEORGE  B. DORR  BICYCLE  PATH
LITTLE  HUNTER'S  BEACH
BAR  ISLAND  GLACIAL  TRAIL 
ABANDONED  DUCK  BROOK  TRAIL
BASS  HARBOR  LIGHTHOUSE  TRAIL
THE  LIGHTHOUSE  KEEPER'S  TRAIL
RUDOLPH  BRUNNOW  WORK  CREW  TRAIL
LAKE  WOOD
OLD  LAKE   WOOD ROAD
CAVES OF ACADIA NATIONAL PARK
WITCH  HOLE  POND  MARSH  TRAIL
CADILLAC  MOUNTAIN  SURVEY  ROAD
OLD  WATER  PIPE  TRAIL
SCHOONER  HEAD  ROAD  UNMARKED  PATHS
THE  GURNEE  TRAIL
KEBO MOUNTAIN'S LOST STAIRWAY LOCATED
BEAR  BROOK  QUARRY  PATH
BEAR BROOK - JACKSON LAB CONNECTOR TRAIL
GREAT HILL - BRACKEN TRAIL
THE  STONE  TOWER
ABANDONED SECTION  CADILLAC NORTH RIDGE TRAIL
ABANDONED  SUNSET  HILL  TRAIL
CEDAR  SWAMP  MOUNTAIN  CRASH  SITE
OLD  WITCH  HOLE  POND  TRAIL
SUNSET  HILL  GHOST  TRAIL
ABANDONED CARRIAGE ROAD ENTRANCE TO POND
ROBINHOOD  PARK
OLD  OTTER  CLIFFS  RADIO  STATION  ROAD
MCFARLAND  MOUNTAIN  SKI  SLOPE  PATH
GREAT  HILL  SUMMIT  TRAIL
EXPLORING  BREWER  MOUNTAIN
CAPT.  KIDD'S  LOST  TREASURE
ABANDONED  GOAT  TRAIL  LOCATED
SCHOONER  HEAD  ROAD'S  UNMARKED  PATHS
EXPLORING  BAR  ISLAND
HUGUENOT  HEAD  TRAIL
THE  OLD  FERN  TRAIL
GREEN MOUNTAIN CARRIAGE ROAD
LOCOMOTIVE  ON  THE  MOVE




INTERESTING   FINDS




STONE  BEACH  COTTAGE
THE  ANNE  M.  ARCHBOLD  ESTATE
BUILDING  OF  THE  ARTS
ABANDONED SEAL COVE SHIP WRECK
THE  FISH  HOUSE  ROAD
RED  ROCK  SPRING  LOCATED
BARBERRY  LEDGE  REMAINS
THIRLSTANE - BAR HARBOR'S VANISHING CASTLE
THE  OLD  EAGLE  LAKE  ROAD
SPOUTING HORN CAVE AT SCHOONER HEAD
BREWER ICE HOUSE AT EAGLE LAKE
SEAWALL'S  SMALL  HIDDEN  BEACH
THE SOUTHWEST HARBOR CAUSEWAY DAM
REMAINS OF JACK PERKINS ESTATE - BAR ISLAND
SHIP HARBOR TO WONDERLAND
SEAWALL CAMPGROUND AND THE HIO ROAD
SEAL  COVE  - COOLEST  SPOT  ON  THE  ISLAND
GREAT  HILL  WATER  RESERVOIR  
THE  OLD  POTTERS  SHOP
SCOTT'S  HILL  &  BAR  HARBOR  WATER  COMPANY
OLD  PICKETT  MOUNTAIN  PATH
BAR HARBOR'S HISTORIC ESTATES
SIEUR DE MONTS SPRING  MYSTERY
THE MOUNT DESERT  NURSERIES
CADILLAC MOUNTAIN'S REAL SUMMIT
THE HOMANS TRAIL - LOST NO MORE
A TRAGEDY ON NEWPORT MOUNTAIN
THE METEORITE OF WITCH HOLE POND
THE SECRET CAVE OF FLYING MOUNTAIN
"Schistostega Cave."  of Bald Porcupine Island
DEER  BROOK TRAIL AND PET CEMETERY
THE ROCKERFELLER  BOATHOUSE
THE  STONE  BARN  NATURE  TRAIL
KEBO MOUNTAIN GRANITE MINING SITE
GREAT  HILL  WATER  TOWER
THE  HIGH  SEAS  -  HAUNTED  STILL
MAN  OF  WAR  WATERFALL
ORANGE  AND  BLACK  TRAIL
YOUNG'S  MOUNTAIN  TRAIL  EXPLORED



LOOSE   ENDS


V.I.A. ROADS AND PATHS COMMITTEE REPORTS
STEPHEN   PERRIN   REMEMBERED
THE  MINATURE  PRECIPICE  -  REAL  OR  MYTH?
1896 DESCRIPTION OF TRAILS
DOWNLOAD  FREE  TRAIL  E-BOOK  HERE
TRAIL  TALK
MEMORIAL TO THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIFE HERE
THE ACADIA YOU HAVEN'T SEEN - VOL 1
BAR HARBOR HISTORIC SHORE PATH
ACADIA NATIONAL PARKS MOST DANGEROUS CAVE
FREE  PUBLIC  DOMAIN  MAPS
MOUNT DESERT ISLAND'S DEVIL'S TRIANGLE
OLD  MAPS  OF  ACADIA  NATIONAL  PARK
PLANE CRASH LANDS ON KEBO GOLF COURSE
CASE OF THE DISAPPEARING PARK
DEATH IN ACADIA  - A BOOK REVIEW

LINK  TO  OUR  VIDEOS

Sunday, September 15, 2019

KEBO MOUNTAIN'S LOST STAIRWAY LOCATED

I have been searching for a number of years for the lost Kebo Mountain stairway with no success.  Old maps seemed to suggest about where the lost stairway should of been, and I have not been the only one who has spent time into researching and searching for the stairway, yet others efforts also came up short.  For some time it began to look like the Lost Kebo Mountain stairway was nothing more than a myth,   And if such a stairway did exist, how has it evaded detection for all these years
From what I have read, others conducted their searches the same way I conducted mine, walking along the base of the mountain and searching for signs of either an abandoned trail or stone steps, but such searches ended in failure,   mainly because the steps can't be seen from the official trail and the abandoned section of the trail near the base of the mountain is pretty well over grown.  In other words, in this case the best approach to locating the trail is from above.
It is worth pointing out that I did not locate the trail, as I stated, all my past efforts were in searching for the trail below, just off of the  Stratheden path.  Jennifer Maher Galas took a new approach searching for the trail, conducting her search along the Kebo Mountain Trail.  Her efforts paid off in discovering places where one small rock was placed upon a much larger rock, or boulder.  This is a method often used  in the marking of abandoned trails as a way not to bring attention to that area.  But to be completely honest, this lost stairway path was actually hiding right out in plain sight.  You see, besides using one small rock placed on a much larger rock, there are other tell tale signs that an abandoned trail or an area that the park service wants to keep people away from is close by and that method is where a number of fallen tree branches are placed across the start of a trail.
As seen here, pile of odd tree branches often block start of abandoned trails
Main Kebo Trail to left, abandoned trail to right


And there it was, sticking out like a sore thumb at a turn in the Kebo Mountain  official Trail,  one nicely stacked pile of tree branches  serving to block the start of the lost Kebo Mountain Stairway trail.
As soon as I spotted that pile of tree branches I knew it was the start of the abandoned trail and stepped over them, following what   to this day is a pretty good clearing where the path ran.  As I progressed I spotted those unique rock signs, one tiny rock on a much larger one, and within minutes we were at the stone steps.


The steps have not seen much traffic in many long years and a good number of the steps are tilted or loose, with dry leaves on them which can make them some what slippery.  The steps lead downwards fairly steep as they make their way deeper into the woods and at one spot a tree has grown up right in the middle of the steps, showing just how long it has been since the steps were last maintained.
Once you reach the tree in the middle of the steps, the steps continue a ways further and stop.  From there it appears whatever steps were below have all slid out of place, so we continued downward where it clearly appeared the trail went, and soon saw more rock signs with one small rock on a much larger one, in a couple places we found actually rock piles, but not many.  We reached one spot where it appeared the trail went right, but that ended at a dead end, so we returned back took a left, which led to more rock signs before we came out onto the Steath Eden Path, not far from the Park Loop Road.
I would say that if you are not experienced with abandoned trails, you may want to avoid this one, as knowing what signs to look for are key in following this abandoned trail.    That said, this is not a trail you really have to fear getting lost along, once the stone steps end and you continue down the mountain side a short ways, the land flattens out and you can hear the traffic along the Park Loop Road nearby and the   Stratheden Path runs along that entire side of the mountain.  I did find the ground to be some what slippery in a few areas caused by dry leaves on the ground where the trail gets a little steep.    I did take GPS readings along the way which I will place at the bottom of this post, avoid reading those if you want to try your luck at finding the trail from above on your own, as I said, that unmistakable pile of tree branches really gives the start of the trail away.



rock on rock often used to mark abandoned trails

Stone Steps Kebo Mountain Lost Stairway Trail

Stone Steps Kebo Mountain Lost Stairway Trail




Stone Steps of Kebo Mountain Lost Stairway Trail
Acadia National Park - Kebo Mountain
Section of worn path below stone steps
Kebo Mountain lost Stone Steps Trail - Acadia National Park

Deer keeping an eye on us
Acadia National Park


KEBO MOUNTAIN - Acadia National Park




DIRECTIONS;
From the Park Loop Road where the official  Kebo Mountain Trail begins by the middle of a long curve in the road, follow the trail to the right, the Kebo Trail is steep so bring water and take rests as needed.  You will come to the summit of  Kebo Mountain, marked by a pile of rocks and a wooden sign.  Continue to follow the trail which at one point will begin to go downhill before it straightens out.  This is a saddle between two peaks, follow it and at one point the main trail takes a right hand turn, and that turn, to the left and along the side of the trail is a neat pile of tree branches that look out of place, as if they were placed there to block something, that is the start of the lost Kebo Mountain Stairway Trail.  If you go past that spot, the trail begins to climb again, so the abandoned trail is just before the main trail begins to go uphill again.

I will add a map for this soon.

Trail Begins behind pile of tree branches;
44 22.306  -  068 13.089

small rock on large
44 22.300  -  068 13.055

stone steps begin
44 22.307  -  068 13.050

stone steps beyond tree
44 22.308  - 068 13.038

trail near base of mountain
44 22.313   -   068 13.027

rock on rock
44 22.323   -   068 13.019

rock on rock
44 22.329   -   068 13.003

rock on rock
44 22.331   -   068 12.993

trail joins  Stratheden Path
44 22.337   -   068 12.989

Sunday, July 28, 2019

LAKE WOOD - ACADIA NATIONAL PARK'S SECRET BEACH

It was a nice day today, in the 70's with a light breeze, perfect beach weather - but choosing which beach to go to is not an easy task.  Both Sand Beach as well as Echo Lake Beach would of been crowded  with full parking lots.  And the beach at Sand Point is ocean water, too cold, plus a very popular spot for picnic's, so that too was most likely crowded.  Clearly on a day like this, what was needed was a nice sand beach on a lake, with warm water, and a nice high ledge to dive from, for anyone wanting to dive into such warm waters - thankfully a secluded spot in Acadia National Park had just what the doctor ordered in the name of Lake Wood Pond.

LAKE WOOD
Acadia National Park

Is it fair to classify Lake Wood Pond as an abandoned trail, well the National Park Service certainly doesn't advertise or promote it, in fact, the only two signs marking the entrance is a simple blue street sign, "Lake Wood Pond Road - PVT.  and a short ways in the tell tale park gate, that's it.  The truth is, Lake Wood hovers on the verge of being abandoned, just like Compass Harbor and its two beaches.
Lake Wood Pond has two relatively small parking areas considering how large the pond is, and you reach the parking areas by driving up a narrow dirt road.  The first or upper parking lot has an unmarked path across from it, with a simple sign, no alcoholic drinks, the path does have a couple places with rocks and roots sticking up in the path, but overall is fairly an easy walk.   The path is easy to follow and gets you much further up the side of the lake, where the path reaches the waters edge, to the right not far away is a ledge people like to dive off of and some nice areas to sit along the shore.   On this day, despite the sign of no alcohol, a group of eight were walking along the path with one guy carrying a 30 pack of beer - oh well, maybe he was from another country and didn't read English.  In all I would estimate there was between 30 to 35 people of all ages at Lake Wood Pond today, about 12 of them at the sand beach at the head of the pond, the little ones were having a blast in the warm water.
The sand beach can be reached from the lower parking lot further in, where their is  a path with a gate across it leading to the small beach.  The sand beach may be small considering the size of the pond, but the more than inviting warm waters of the pond more than make up for it, and for the kids,  inflatable pool toys are welcome.  Once you step around that gate, several yards past the gate look for a path leading through the woods on the right, the path becomes more worn the further you follow it and ends where the Park Property ends and the property of Iris Farms begins. That unmarked path was once the other half of the Lake Wood Pond Road, abandoned today, the open and well worn path makes for an enjoyable walk through the woods with a brook to the left of the path.  When the park property ends the path comes to a no trespassing sign, and just beyond the path comes to a field behind Iris farm.
If this pond, as large and beautiful as it is were located any other place other than Acadia national Park, any city or town would consider it a gem and put it on display for all to see, but clearly the National Park Service seems content to hide it away in hopes not too many people discover it.  I do have to add this one note, I find the street sign to the place a bit confusing - Lake Wood Pond Rd.  PVT. - what to hell is up with the private label, Lake Wood is open to the public and should not be listed as a private road - just saying, wake up National Park Service.  And yes, the pond is a favorite swimming hole with the locals.
We ended up not going into the water, but really today there was no need for that, simply finding a spot under the trees along the shore of the lake was enough, it was so much cooler at  Lake Wood with Young's Mountain rising in the background.

LAKE WOOD - ACADIA NATIONAL PARK'S SECRET BEACH
HULL'S COVE - CROOKED ROAD


How to locate the nearly unmarked entrance to Lake Wood;

From Hull's Cove, turn onto the Crooked Road and follow it about .7 miles, once you come to the Public Works area with dirt piles, begin watching the left hand side of the road for a distinct blue street sign, Lake Wood Pond Rd. PVT.  The narrow dirt road is not very long and you will soon come to the first parking area.  Continue to follow the dirt road to the second parking area if your heading to the beach, which is not one of the larger sand beaches on the island.  Also note the sign as your entering, this is a day area only and you must leave at dusk..

ENTRANCE TO LAKE WOOD
Acadia National Park

LAKE WOOD BEACH
Acadia National Park
Hull's Cove, Crooked Road


LAKE WOOD
Acadia National Park
Hull's Cove - Crooked Road




Tuesday, July 23, 2019

THE OLD POTTERS SHOP

NOT an abandoned trail - just saying.  When the power company purchased the land on Prospect Street off route 3 in Bar Harbor, I was pretty certain this old building was going to be torn down.  At some point No Trespassing Signs were posted on the property and an article came out in the local paper stating the property was once known as the Potter's Shop, and that an effort was going to be made to preserve and fix the building up to how it once appeared, however with each passing year the building has continued to fall into despair.































Saturday, July 20, 2019

GREAT HILL WATER RESERVOIR



This large abandoned reservoir located on the side of Great Hill is one of three that the early Bar Harbor Water Company built to get water from Eagle Lake to in town Bar Harbor. Other then the Stone Tower, this is perhaps one of the easiest abandoned locations within Acadia National Park to locate. It is as easy as 1,2,3,4.

1. Drive up West Street from by the town pier.

2. Cross route 3 and drive straight ahead up West Street Extention.

3. Park by Duck Brook Road just inside park and walk along road to stone bridge.

4. Pass under bridge and look for worn path leading up banking on left, on that small hill is the abandoned Great Hill Water reservoir.

The walk from where you park to the stone bridge is very short, the hike up the hillside no more than 4 or 5 car lengths and you will be standing on the rim of the water reservoir.




The Great Hill Water Reservoir is an abandoned site and there are no signs pointing the way but locating it is very easy. In the nearby woods is the remains of one or two stone buildings which served as part of the reservoir system.
STONE BRIDGE ALONG DUCK BROOK BRIDGE ROAD


There was two more reservoir's that were built, the largest and last one was on Cunningham Hill, also known as North Ridge. Another reservoir was built on Scott's Hill, today better known as Schoolhouse Hill, which is also the site of the remains of The Castle.




Here is a view of the Duck Brook Bridge road taken from the foundation, you can also see another path that leads to the foundation, though that path is a little more steep.
DUCK BROOK BRIDGE ROAD SEEN FROM OLD FOUNDATION

Below is a flume which helped carry water to the reservoir on Great Hill.

BAR HARBOR WATER COMPANY FLUME


ABANDONED GREAT HILL WATER RESERVOIR
Acadia National Park





GREAT HILL ABANDONED WATER RESERVOIR
Acadia National Park

Friday, July 19, 2019

SCOTT'S HILL & THE BAR HARBOR WATER COMPANY

Years ago while researching the Bar Harbor Water Company, I became interested in the three reservoir's the company constructed.  I had located one by accident nearly thirty years ago while aimlessly toaming through the woods along one side of Great Hill, , but it would be much later that I discovered exactly what it was I had found that day.  At first I was convinced I had found the huge foundation to a mansion or perhaps a Hotel, yet it did not look like any foundation I had ever seen before.

GREAT HILL RESERVOIR
Acadia National Park

GPS TO GREAT HILL WATER RESERVOIR

Stone Arched Bridge on Duck Brook Road
44 23' 27" N
68 13' 45" W

AT RESERVOIR ON HILLSIDE OVERLOOKING ROAD
44 23' 28" N
68 13' 48" W

Once I did become aware that it was one of three reservoir's built by the Bar Harbor Water company, I than began to do some research and came upon a document titled, "The History of the Bar Harbor Water Company."  Up to that point I had been studying old maps of the island for some years, and was fascinated when I read that no one knew where the location of Scott's Hill was, the site of a second reservoir - which surprised me, because i was pretty certain I knew exactly where Scott's Hill was located. You see, one of the old maps I liked to study had the names of land owners on it, and I knew from that map that a Mrs. Scott owned land on top of what many call School House Hill today, in fact she owned a large piece of land there.

SCOTT'S HILL MAP (Schoolhouse Hill)
Bar Harbor Maine

And if you look at a map, the reservoir on the side of Great Hill lines up perfectly with School House Hill, or Scott's Hill.  I contacted the local water company by email with my findings and never heard back from anyone...oh well, I simply went back to continuing my research into these reservoir's, and have since made even more discoveries.

SCOTT'S HILL (Schoolhouse Hill)
Bar Harbor, Maine

In a Bar Harbor Record article on the Bar Harbor Water Company, dated Feb. 9, 1893, it states that Mrs. Scott owns a Cottage on top of Scott's Hill, and goes on to state the elevation of her cottage.  It goes on to list other land owners on Scott's Hill and gives their cottage elevations.  I went back to that old map with the property owner names listed on it, and sure enough, the property owners in that old newspaper article line up with the property owner names on that old map, so there is no question now of where Scott's Hill was located.


I went back and reread that report of the History of the Bar Harbor Water Company, because I was pretty certain I noticed another mistake in that report.  It states that though it is not know what the reservoir on Scott's Hill was constructed of, it is believed it was constructed of stone.  This is not correct, at least according to old newspaper articles from the late 1800's which state that the reservoir on Scott's Hill was constructed of wood.  I know from that report that people from the Water Company did a search for that lost reservoir and could not locate it, however if it was constructed of wood, one would not find evidence of it all these years later, even if you were searching on the right hill.

POST CARD SHOWING VIEW FROM SCOTT'S HILL
Bar Harbor, Maine

A third and final reservoir was constructed on a place named Cunningham Hill, I did research on that and learned that Cunningham Hill was also known as North Ridge??  I have not had any luck tracking this third and largest reservoir down, but the Water Company report states the third reservoir had to be build because the one on Scott's Hill did not furnish enough water pressure.  Not long after the third reservoir was constructed the entire reservoir system was abandoned in favor of pipes.


PHOTO SHOWING VIEW FROM SCOTT'S HILL
Bar Harbor, Maine.

GREAT HILL WATER RESERVOIR
Acadia National Park

VIEW OF DUCK BROOK ROAD AND BRIDGE FROM RESERVOIR
Acadia National Park

I gave the GPS for the Great Hill Water Reservoir, and I will put up a simple map soon, but for now I will say even if its your first time to Acadia National Park, you can easily locate this abandoned Reservoir.
From bottom of Main Street in Bar Harbor by the town pier, follow West Street until you come to intersection with Eden Street - route 3.  Continue straight ahead and up over the hill until you come to signs of entering the park.  Just ahead, on the right, is the Duck Brook Road - the road is blocked to automobiles, but you will not need a car or bike.  Park there and walk a short ways to the Stone Bridge, just after passing under that bridge, up on the hillside is the abandoned Water Reservoir, worn paths there lead right up to it, the path closest to the side of the bridge simply takes you to the Park Loop Road above.

BAR HARBOR WATER COMPANY FLUME


GREAT HILL RESERVOIR MAP
Acadia National Park








Thursday, July 18, 2019

THE GURNEE TRAIL

Some of the very first paths on Mount Desert Island where what was known as Village Connector Path and were usually built because of the danger back than of walking along often narrow dirt roads, which was the case with Eden Street back in the day.  It was a very narrow dirt road with a narrow bridge crossing over Duck Brook.  A rough side walk ran up along Eden street all the way to Duck Brook, as is the case today, but from Duck Brook onward to Hulls Cove, you were pretty much on your own.

THE GURNEE TRAIL - Acadia National Park

People in both Hulls Cove and in Bar Harbor began to voice that they would like to see a Village Connector Path built, from Duck Brook Bridge to a brook in Hulls Cove..  Before any money could go into such a venture, the town of Bar Harbor wanted to know a few things, was such a connector trail needed, and once built would people use it.  The answer to both questions proved to be a sound yes, and money was set aside for such a connector path.
The Village Connector Path was built, so what became of the path that became known as the Gurnee path?

THE GURNEE TRAIL
ACADIA NATIONAL PARK

The simply answer is that it was abandoned, but unlike many of the trails the National Park Service would abandoned without any rhyme or reason, the Gurnee trail actually had a very sound reason for abandoning it, large sections of the trail were beinjg eaten away over time.
That's right, eaten away - each time improvements were made to Eden Street and route 3, those improvements cut into sections of the Gurnee Path.  When it came time to widen route 3 and build a new and wider bridge, it left sections of the old trail cut up in places, and dangerously close to the edge of the ledges along the Bluffs.  Following a park report that studied the connector path, the report came to the conclusion that the trail could be reopened, but at significant cost, with a bulk of the cost being at the area known as the Bluff.  Recommendation, the path would not be reopened.

THE GURNEE PATH
ACADIA NATIONAL PARK

I have to admit, I was curious as to just how close to the edge of the Bluff the path came, remember, a few different times over the years the road below was widened, and each time it brought the Gurnee Path closer and closer to the edge of the Bluff.

GURNEE PATH APPROACHING THE BLUFFS
ACADIA NATIONAL PARK

I made my way to the start of the path where it began to cross the Bluff, and sure enough, the path runs right up along the side of the Bluff for a short ways, enough so as to make it very dangerous due to how close to the edge it came and due to loose rocks and gravel.  And as the Park report stated, it would cost a bunch of George Washington's to fix the problem, since to your immediate right is the edge of the Bluff, and to your left is a tall wall of solid granite, the passage way through is set in stone, as they say.  In my opinion they would have to blast in some areas, and use jack hammers in others, so I do not see this path ever being reopened.

GURNEE PATH
ACADIA NATIONAL PARK

And now, we have just gone through one more widening of route 3, my guess is the path along the section of the Bluff is totally gone now, and how much damage might of been done to other areas of the Gurnee Path is unknown, but I do plan on going in and seeing how much of the path remains in tact.
The amazing thing is that if you were simply wandering through the woods and came upon sections of the Gurnee Path, you would swear you had come to an official hiking trail, so good is the shape of some sections of the old trail.  Locating a long section of the trail still in very good shape is as simple as 1, 2, 3
1;  walk along Eden Street (route 3) past the College of the Atlantic, past the Ferry Terminal, and continue until just before a curve in the road,
2;  just before the curve look for signs of an old dirt driveway on the left and follow that driveway to a set of steps (see photo)
3;  walk up the steps and continue straight ahead up the hillside about four car lengths and you will be at the trail.

STONE STEPS ALONG DRIVEWAY
GURNEE PATH - ACADIA NATIONAL PARK
Once at the good section of the Gurnee Trail, going right will find pine trees growing up in the center of the path in places and some areas of brush before you reach what appears to be the end by a drop off area and a wall of solid granite.  Just before that, to the left, is a gully I followed upward and made my way past that dead end, than made my way back down to the other side of the trail, which quickly takes you to sheer drop offs as the trail continues toward the Bluffs, this is one of the danger areas of the old trail, beyond this the trail moves upward and away from those drop offs and the trail forward is very well defined and worn.


At the trail, if you go left, the trail is pretty open and easy to follow,  It reaches an area where telephone poles cross the trail, and it appears the trail ends there, which it kind of does today.  From the telephone pole area, the path turns left and heads toward route 3 - Eden Street, but quickly ends at a sheer drop off where the widening of route 3 destroyed  a section of the trail.

Above is a photo of the path near a drop off with a pine tree growing up in the center of the path, to one side of path is the drop off, to the other side is a wall of granite and rock.

VIDEO OF THE GURNEE PATH

Start of old driveway along rt. 3 Eden Street
latitude       44 24' 14" N
longitude    68 14' 3" W

stone steps
latitude       44 24' 15" N
longitude    68 14' 4" W

Worn Gurnee Trail
latitude       44 24' 15" N
longitude    68 14' 5" W